pre-med news

Why New York University Just Made Its Medical School Free

Why New York University Just Made Its Medical School Free

By: Ryan Kelly

Imagine winning $250,000. No, you didn’t go to Vegas, and you didn’t even buy a lottery ticket. You show up to your white coat ceremony on your first day of medical school, where the dean announces that “you get free med school, and you get free med school, and you get free med school. Everybody gets free med school!” It’s like Oprah on steroids.

Pre-Med News Roundup March 8, 2016

Pre-Med News Roundup March 8, 2016

By: Ryan Kelly

New FDA chief will champion clinical trials. Now that Robert Califf has been voted FDA commissioner, critics worry that he’ll hand the car keys over to drug companies and let them drive their agenda. But his supporters think he'll improve the approval process and remove unnecessary industry hoops. Everyone agrees that his long-time commitment to clinical trials will guide his policy and decision making. Click the MedPage Today link to find out more.   

Hospice patients not always seen on last days. In the last 2 years, approximately 12% of hospice patients have not received a visit from professional staff during the last 2 days of life. Many would argue that this number is alarmingly high, especially given the expected sensitivity surrounding end-of-life care. This article explores correlating factors within the data in order to assess the problem and propose solutions. Click the MedPage Today link to find out more.

When cancer treatment offers more hope than cure. This heartfelt feature narrates a doctor’s story as he faces the unfortunate task of suggesting hospice to his seemingly terminal cancer patient. Even though he felt ethically justified, he compares this breach in conversation to a betrayal. After his anecdote, he uses chemotherapy as an example to theorize on the costs and power of providing hope during treatment. Click the New York Times link to find out more.

The price is wrong: the physical costs of behavioral health issues. With increasing patient complexity and rising costs (US healthcare at $3 trillion), the demands placed on physicians have increased in parallel. One possible fix is to mend the gap between physical and behavioral health within clinics. The separation makes little economic sense and decreases patient satisfaction. Enhanced integration between them is one logical target for improving the broader healthcare landscape. Click the Huffington Post link to find out more.  

Pre-Med News Roundup December 7, 2015

Pre-Med News Roundup December 7, 2015

I Am Paying for Your Expensive Medicine The New York Times editorial looks at how we value new medications versus how we pay for them.  A new effective cholesterol lowering drug would cost $14,000 per patient every year, but everyone’s insurance rates would go up to pay for the patients who require it.  Value in healthcare proponents argue that high prices should be linked to high health benefits.  

New questions require doctors to learn about military medicine The USMLE will now include questions regarding military medicine in each of its steps.  Physicians are seeing more patients with issues that disproportionately affect veterans, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injuries, and the affects of Agent Orange, as more and more veterans are served in civilian facilities.  This also means that medical schools’ curricula will have to follow.

The Start-Up That Will Keep Health-Insurance Companies Honest Two Harvard millennials have used technology to help distill the huge amount of information that exists on health insurance to recommend the best plans for people based on their personal needs, rather than just showing them lists of options.  The website plots all the plans on a two-dimensional graph to allow customers to see what the real costs and deductibles will be at the end of the day.   

Pre-Med News Roundup October 5, 2015

Pre-Med News Roundup October 5, 2015

Medical Schools Teach Students To Talk With Patients About Care Costs  “What's the difference between cost, charge and payment?” Medical schools are helping students understand the costs of medicine through newly integrated coursework. The reason for the change is most likely high-value care or values based purchasing, which came in with the Affordable Care Act.

Pragmatic Advice For Would-Be Health Entrepreneurs From The Medicine X Conference This article takes a look at technology, entrepreneurship, and medicine.  It’s an interesting take from a tech guy who understands the world of medicine.  The author also gives a couple of great book suggestions, as well.

Top Medical Schools React to Harvard’s Curriculum Change

Pre-Med News Roundup July 13, 2015

Pre-Med News Roundup July 13, 2015

California Northstate University Wins Accreditation to Launch Medical School, Will Open in Fall California is getting a new medical school in fall 2015.  Before you get too excited though, it is the first accredited for-profit medical school to open in the nation.  The school will not focus on research, rather on getting doctors ready to treat patients.  Even though applications for this fall just opened, the school expects their first class to be full within a few weeks.

MIT Turns Hacking Medicine Program Into an Institute to Study Digital Health  With wearable technology becoming more ubiquitous, MIT has created an institute that will study the intersectionality between technology and health.

Examining Race-Based Admissions Bans On Medical Schools NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam discusses how legal bans on race-based admissions have affected the diversity in medical schools.

 

Pre-Med News Roundup June 15, 2015

Pre-Med News Roundup June 15, 2015

Predictive Medicine Uses Genome Sequencing To Forecast Illness Before It Happens This NIH study is helping doctors find illnesses before they even happen by studying genetic mutations in DNA.  

A Top Medical School Revamps Requirements To Lure English Majors  Mt. Sinai’s School of Medicine is emphasizing the humanistic side of medicine as they accept non-traditional pre-meds.  The  HuMed program took humanities majors from specific liberal arts institutions and allowed them to skip the MCAT.  Their new program, FlexMed is going to be open to even more students.  The school hopes that humanities majors will bring different perspectives to medicine.

Viral History in a Drop of Blood Researchers at Harvard and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have developed the technology to see every virus you have every had in a single drop of blood. This new test will take the guesswork out of patient history and diagnosis.

Pre-Med News Roundup May 25, 2015

Pre-Med News Roundup May 25, 2015

Can Music Be Used as Medicine  Using biometric research, scientists in the Sync Project are looking at how music affects the body and brain.  We like this article, because it shows that research and medicine don’t have to be boring.

Oakland University  William Beaumont School of Medicine to Graduate First Class This Week  Oakland University is one of the newest medical schools in the United States.  Newer schools always have the element of the unknown, but the first graduating class does have a 100% residency match rate.
NIH Leads Effort to Enable Precision Medicine to Revolutionize Health Care Precision medicine may be the medical buzzword for the year, but it is more than just a phrase.  Medical schools, like Ohio State and the UC’s mentioned in the article, are going to be at the forefront of research on DNA sequencing and decoding the roots of cancer using extreme-scale computing and 4D imaging.

Pre-Med News Roundup February 6, 2015

Pre-Med News Roundup February 6, 2015

What is President Obama’s ‘precision medicine’ plan, and how might it help you?  The Washington Post answers some basic questions about President Obama's "Precision Medicine Initiative", which he referred  to in his most recent State of the Union speech.

Institute of Medicine Urges Broader Sharing of Clinical Trial Data  If you are interested in the world of research, we think you  will enjoy this article on proposals to share clinical trial data.  The Institute of Medicine has recommended that government agencies and private companies share their data.

Doctor, Have You Had Your DNA Tested?  As genetic testing gets cheaper and cheaper, more patients are asking doctors whether they should have their DNA sequenced for medical reasons.  This article cautions patients about the limits of this testing.  

Pre-Med News Roundup December 22, 2014

Pre-Med News Roundup December 22, 2014

How the High Cost of Medical Care Is Affecting Americans The New York Times analyzes the data it has been collecting from readers about the costs of medical care.  This piece takes a look at how real people are affected, even those with insurance.

How Two Hospitals are Taking Food as Medicine to Heart Hospitals in Michigan and New York are bringing healthy food to their communities in innovative ways.  We like this story because it shows community medicine in action.

Is Your Heart Doctor In? If Not, You Might Not Be Any Worse Off A new study from the JAMA Internal Medicine found that patients fared better when cardiologists were in short supply in teaching hospitals.  The results may show that aggressive procedures do not actually benefit all patients. 

Pre-Med News Roundup December 11, 2014

Pre-Med News Roundup December 11, 2014

Debunking Vaccine Myths Can Have An Unintended Effect  A new study by the journal Vaccine found that education reduced misbelief, but also reduced the likelihood that people who were uneasy would actually get it.  

An Evolutionary Battle Against Bacteria  Scientists understanding about how bacteria and humans' responses to it have evolved over thousands of years may help prevent diseases like meningitis today.  

If Slow is Good for Food, Why not Medicine?  Slow medicine is the idea that low-tech careful examinations can be more cost efficient and effective.  This article looks at several doctors who are putting slow medicine into practice.