medicare

Pre-Med News Roundup May 2, 2016

Pre-Med News Roundup May 2, 2016

By: Ryan Kelly

New Medicare Rules Would Increase Bonus Opportunities, Ease Reporting. The Obama administration recently proposed two new rules: the Quality Payment Program, which gives doctors two options for getting reimbursed under Medicare. The second rule proposes changes to the highly unpopular Meaningful Use program regarding the documentation of electronic health records (EHRs). 

Pre-Med News Roundup January 4, 2016

Pre-Med News Roundup January 4, 2016

By: Alison Herr

Medical and Health News That Stuck With Us in 2015. The New York Times has rounded up the top health and medical stories of 2015. Their top picks included Ebola, Medicare paid end of life conversations, the true costs of drugs, and many others. This is a great review of 2015.

CardioBrief: Precision Medicine Stuck in Second Grade. There is much hype around precision medicine these days, but a new study shows that genetic testing is a long way off from helping patients in a clinical setting. Researchers hope to change this with help from the NIH's Precision Medicine Initiative.

Kaiser Permanente plans to open its own medical school in 2019. The benefits of a new medical school founded by a healthcare system are the practical experiences students can have in both practitioner and administrative roles and the completely redesigned curriculum. The school will be located in Richmond, California.

Pre-Med News Roundup August 11, 2015

Pre-Med News Roundup August 11, 2015

Worries about HPV vaccine: European Union medicines agency investigating reports of rare but severe reactions Vaccines, and the HPV vaccine in particular, are hot topics in medical ethics.  Although the CDC recommends the HPV vaccine for 11 to 12 year olds, almost a third of teens have not.  So, when cases of severe reactions to vaccines hit the news, you should know the details in order to be able to discuss the risks intelligently.

Telemedicine: New and Easy Way to See the Doctor Telemedicine is being touted as the future of medicine, and a new report shows that it might help employers with savings of $6 billion in their cost of insurance premiums each year.  Other benefits include ease of access for remote patients and immediate assistance for stroke patients.  As a new doctor, technology is going to be part of your world, one way or another.

Medicare Plans to Pay Doctors for Counseling on End of Life Medicare will reimburse doctors for conversations they have with their patients about end of life issues.  This will allow patients to decide whether they would want to be kept alive if they became too sick to speak for themselves.  As the American population ages, many will be able to live longer but still suffer from grave illnesses, which will take its toll on family members, finances, and healthcare resources.  This is one of the biggest issues facing the future of healthcare.

Pre-Med News Roundup October 15, 2014

Pre-Med News Roundup October 15, 2014

U.S. Finds Many Failures in Medicare Health Plans Of the many failures a federal findings on private Medicare health plans is that insurers did not take the doctor's clinical notes into consideration before denying coverage to Medicare patients.   We think that this should be of interest to future doctors who are going to be dealing with Medicare at a higher rate than ever before.

Lies, Damned Lies, and Medical Science Is a thoughtful long-form essay in The Atlantic looking at how researchers and physicians struggle to get the best information to patients.  The piece explores how studies can go off the rails due to funding, misinformation, and a lack of ethics.  This is a great read for future med/scientists.  

Study Backs Stem Cells in Retinas The use of stem cells in medical treatments has taken a huge leap at UCLA where embryonic stem cells have been used to treat macular degeneration, which leads to blindness.  The use of embryonic stem cells is still controversial, and this is may be part of any discussion in medical ethics in medical school.  

Pre-Med News Roundup October 2, 2014

Pre-Med News Roundup October 2, 2014

Panel Urges Overhauling Health Care at End of Life The Institute of Medicine's panel of end of life care found that the system we have is broken.  While elderly patients generally prefer more cost effective palliative in-home services, they are often getting expensive surgical and hospital based procedures.  The disconnect starts from the lack of conversation with patients regarding their advance care planning. 

Doctors Find Barriers to Sharing Digital Medical Records Clinics and hospitals are finding that even when digital health record systems are in place, they struggle to share data with other company's systems.  Doctors will eventually be penalized by Medicare if they cannot share patient data. 

Changes to Medical School Curriculums to Improve Patient Care  The American Medical Association selected 11 medical schools (including UC Davis and UCSF) to each receive a million dollar grant to look for ways to change their curriculums to better reflect patient care since the Affordable Care Act took place. Changes will need to increase efficiency and cut costs in order to keep up with cuts to Medicare reimbursements to doctors.