UCLA

Can Applicants Bribe Their Way into Medical School?

Can Applicants Bribe Their Way into Medical School?

“How much would it cost for you to write my personal statement for me?”


A medical school candidate asked me this question during a particularly stressful moment in the application process. She was a nontraditional applicant with a family and a full-time job, and she was running out of time before her AMCAS submission date.

The Hardest Secondary? How to Conquer the 10 Secondary Essays for UCLA (Geffen) School of Medicine

The Hardest Secondary? How to Conquer the 10 Secondary Essays for UCLA (Geffen) School of Medicine

By: Ryan Kelly

Who wouldn’t want to go to medical school at UCLA? Top-ranked, exceptional match list, nearby beaches (not that you’ll have time to frequent them during medical school). There’s a reason UCLA gets nearly 10,000 applicants each year.

A big part of whether you get selected for an interview, however, is the UCLA secondary essay. There are 10 (count ‘em) essays just for UCLA. The good news? They’re short: a mere 800 characters.

It can be useful (and fun?) to see your frame before getting started.

Pre-Med News Roundup October 15, 2014

Pre-Med News Roundup October 15, 2014

U.S. Finds Many Failures in Medicare Health Plans Of the many failures a federal findings on private Medicare health plans is that insurers did not take the doctor's clinical notes into consideration before denying coverage to Medicare patients.   We think that this should be of interest to future doctors who are going to be dealing with Medicare at a higher rate than ever before.

Lies, Damned Lies, and Medical Science Is a thoughtful long-form essay in The Atlantic looking at how researchers and physicians struggle to get the best information to patients.  The piece explores how studies can go off the rails due to funding, misinformation, and a lack of ethics.  This is a great read for future med/scientists.  

Study Backs Stem Cells in Retinas The use of stem cells in medical treatments has taken a huge leap at UCLA where embryonic stem cells have been used to treat macular degeneration, which leads to blindness.  The use of embryonic stem cells is still controversial, and this is may be part of any discussion in medical ethics in medical school.