Standing Out

6 Strategies to Make Your Interview Answers More Interesting

6 Strategies to Make Your Interview Answers More Interesting

By: Ryan Kelly

Pre-meds tend to have a lot of substance. They spend hundreds of hours helping patients in the hospital, countless more volunteering for good causes, and even devote themselves, unpaid, to developing research that benefits humanity. It takes character and drive to do these things, and we should appreciate how much good pre-meds do.

What Separates the Typical from Stand-out Pre-Meds

What Separates the Typical from Stand-out Pre-Meds

By: Rob Humbracht

One of our core philosophies is based on a question that most pre-meds aren’t asking before they apply to medical school.

“Why should medical schools accept you? What makes you stand out?”

If you’re scratching your head right now, you’ll want to take some time to answer this question for yourself.

How to Sell Yourself Without Sounding Full of Yourself

How to Sell Yourself Without Sounding Full of Yourself

By: Ryan Kelly

You’re in competition with thousands of qualified medical school applicants for a limited number of spots, so you have to “sell yourself” to stand out. But you don’t want to come across as pompous, pretentious, or self-righteous. The dreaded “holier than thou” tone that will make admissions officers’ skin crawl.

So, how do you “sell yourself” without sounding full of yourself in your medical school personal statement?

How to Avoid the Pre-Med Blues

How to Avoid the Pre-Med Blues

Sky blue. Robin’s egg blue. Turquoise. Cerulean. Navy. Denim. Teal. Periwinkle. Aquamarine. Some of these Crayola crayons are fancier sounding than others and some hardly seem blue at all (looking at you Periwinkle), but in the end, they’re all blue.

As the admissions committee drafts a medical school class, it also uses an array of colors. Admissions committees believe in the value of diversity, not just the usual skin colors but also a diversity of perspectives, majors, and backgrounds. The class needs only so many “typical pre-meds” (or blue crayons),

Moral of the story: if you’re blue like everyone else, you’ll have a harder time getting selected.

6 Ways to Level Up Your Medical School Application

6 Ways to Level Up Your Medical School Application

By: Ryan Kelly

Being a pre-med is like playing a massive, multiplayer role-playing game (RPG). Similar to characters in RPGs, pre-meds must gain experience, collaborate with others, conquer obstacles, and step into unfamiliar territory.

Okay sure--there’s a big difference between navigating your Night Elf Druid through a dungeon and let’s say, volunteering in the ER. But the idea is the same. You’re trying to “level up”-- whether in the game or real life.

3 Tips for “Average” Pre-Meds to Stand Out in Their Medical School Admissions Essays

3 Tips for “Average” Pre-Meds to Stand Out in Their Medical School Admissions Essays

By: Ryan Kelly

The dreaded “diversity question.” 

Each year, as students fill out their secondary applications, they’re bombarded with essay prompts about their “diverse qualities,” “unique insights,” or “unusual life experiences.” Schools will usually ask how these qualities, insights, or experiences will contribute to their campus or environment. 

Highly Recommended: Why Where You Keep Your Ketchup Can Help Get You Into Med School

Highly Recommended: Why Where You Keep Your Ketchup Can Help Get You Into Med School

By: Ryan Kelly

When pre-meds see the word “diverse,” they’re likely to consider race, gender, ethnicity, or class status. Most would never think about where their families stored the ketchup.

According to Scott Page--professor of complex systems at the University of Michigan--British people and African Americans from the South most likely kept their ketchup in the cupboard, while everyone else most likely kept it in the fridge.

Highly Recommended: How to Interest People and Make Them Like You Instantly

Highly Recommended: How to Interest People and Make Them Like You Instantly

By: Ryan Kelly

Excerpts from Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People

Pre-meds need help, and not just psychiatric help (though, let’s be honest, plenty of them do). To get into medical school, pre-meds need the help of influential people: professors, doctors, and even other student-group leaders. Pre-meds are often assertive and competitive people, but that’s not always enough to secure letters of recommendation, internships, or research positions.