New York Times

Pre-Med News Roundup August 1, 2016

Pre-Med News Roundup August 1, 2016

By: Ryan Kelly

Naloxone Saves Lives, but is No Cure in Heroin Epidemic. Every day, thousands of people who overdose on opioids are being revived with naloxone. Hailed as a miracle drug, it carries no health risk. It cannot be abused and does no harm to non-drug users. Most likely, it saves a life. But some argue that this safety net encourages users to up the ante and seek higher highs. Click the New York Times link to learn more about the use and regulation of this “miracle drug.”

Pre-Med News Roundup May 2, 2016

Pre-Med News Roundup May 2, 2016

By: Ryan Kelly

New Medicare Rules Would Increase Bonus Opportunities, Ease Reporting. The Obama administration recently proposed two new rules: the Quality Payment Program, which gives doctors two options for getting reimbursed under Medicare. The second rule proposes changes to the highly unpopular Meaningful Use program regarding the documentation of electronic health records (EHRs). 

Pre-med News Roundup February 8, 2016

Pre-med News Roundup February 8, 2016

By: Ryan Kelly

Alzheimer’s advances on the horizon. For most of history, this neurodegenerative disease has puzzled scientists and left the afflicted and their loved ones in a state of emotional drain. Luckily, there is hope to better detect, diagnose, and treat the disease. This article from the San Diego Union Tribune covers the causes of Alzheimer’s and a new wave of experimental drugs and treatments. Also see the Tribune’s article about the revamping of UCSD’s Alzheimer’s program.

 

New guidelines nudge doctors to give patients access to medical records. This New York Times article discusses the Obama administration’s recent efforts to remove barriers in patients’ freedom and autonomy. The article covers the new set of guidelines and includes testimonials from both patients and healthcare professionals. Also see how patients are contributing their records toward Obama’s “precision medicine” initiative.


No antibiotics for colds and sore throats. This article in MedPage Today discusses the advice from two prominent doctors groups, urging physicians to avoid antibiotics for uncomplicated cases during the current flu season. The article includes the guidance published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and provides information about the dangers and costs of overusing antibiotics during treatment.   

Pre-Med News Roundup January 4, 2016

Pre-Med News Roundup January 4, 2016

By: Alison Herr

Medical and Health News That Stuck With Us in 2015. The New York Times has rounded up the top health and medical stories of 2015. Their top picks included Ebola, Medicare paid end of life conversations, the true costs of drugs, and many others. This is a great review of 2015.

CardioBrief: Precision Medicine Stuck in Second Grade. There is much hype around precision medicine these days, but a new study shows that genetic testing is a long way off from helping patients in a clinical setting. Researchers hope to change this with help from the NIH's Precision Medicine Initiative.

Kaiser Permanente plans to open its own medical school in 2019. The benefits of a new medical school founded by a healthcare system are the practical experiences students can have in both practitioner and administrative roles and the completely redesigned curriculum. The school will be located in Richmond, California.

Pre-Med News Roundup December 7, 2015

Pre-Med News Roundup December 7, 2015

I Am Paying for Your Expensive Medicine The New York Times editorial looks at how we value new medications versus how we pay for them.  A new effective cholesterol lowering drug would cost $14,000 per patient every year, but everyone’s insurance rates would go up to pay for the patients who require it.  Value in healthcare proponents argue that high prices should be linked to high health benefits.  

New questions require doctors to learn about military medicine The USMLE will now include questions regarding military medicine in each of its steps.  Physicians are seeing more patients with issues that disproportionately affect veterans, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injuries, and the affects of Agent Orange, as more and more veterans are served in civilian facilities.  This also means that medical schools’ curricula will have to follow.

The Start-Up That Will Keep Health-Insurance Companies Honest Two Harvard millennials have used technology to help distill the huge amount of information that exists on health insurance to recommend the best plans for people based on their personal needs, rather than just showing them lists of options.  The website plots all the plans on a two-dimensional graph to allow customers to see what the real costs and deductibles will be at the end of the day.